COURSE DESCRIPTION

Business
ACCT201
Accounting I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This underlying framework of this course guides students through accounting concepts and standards for the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Topics include accounting cycles, accounting systems, internal control, inventory, accounts receivable, cash flows, assets, liabilities, equity, and forms of business organizations. Services, merchandising and partnership accounting is also included.

ACCT202
Accounting II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ACCT201
Co-requisites: None

This course is a continuation from Accounting I and focuses on financial and managerial accounting fundamentals. Financial aspects include the transactions and recording of common, preferred, and treasury stocks, paid-in-capital, dividends, retained earnings, earnings per-share, bonds, investments, preparation and analysis of the statement of cash flows and analysis of financial statements. Management accounting aspects include the interpretation and use of accounting data in management planning, control and reports, cost concepts and measurement, cost concepts and measurement, costvolume-profit relationships, budgeting and responsibility accounting, flexible budget and standard costs, activity-based costing transfer pricing, and special business decisions and capital budgeting.

BLAW331
Legal Environment of Business
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Complete 200 level business courses
Co-requisites: ENGL102

This course reviews a wide range of legal topics, with particular focus on those impacting upon business, including both public and private law governing business practices and transactions. Starting with several major areas of law that together make up the legal environment of business, this course treats in detail the law of contracts, and analyses other public and private law areas, including the law governing business entities.

ECON202
Microeconomics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course introduces students to the nature of economics, economic concepts, scarcity and choice, price system, distribution of income, decision-making by consumers and firms, comparative economic systems, perfect and imperfect competition.

ECON203
Macroeconomics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course emphasizes the concepts and problems in macroeconomics, the macroeconomics principles and policy on aggregate expenditure and equilibrium output, monetary and fiscal policy, interest rate and money supply, and the role of the Federal Reserve System. Also included are topics on aggregate demand and supply, the labor market, inflation, money and banking, contemporary problems, fluctuation in economic growth and productivity, and the global economy on international trade, comparative advantage and protectionism.

FINS323
Introduction to Financial Management
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Complete 200 level business courses
Co-requisites: ENGL102

A study of the fundamentals of financial management, focusing on financial analysis and forecasting, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting and its risk, capital asset pricing model (CAPM), the determination of beta, asset, and firm risks, dividend policy and its interrelation with investment and financing, capital structuring theory, financial markets, shortand long-term financing, fundamentals of discounted cash flow, and the concept of a return target.

GBUS101
Preparatory Business
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of business and to the various concentrations within the field. Students would be exposed to fundamental economic concepts and problems from both a micro and macro view, and how it affects the nature of business. Students would also study basic accounting concepts and procedures in preparing accounting statements; and learn how to evaluate performance and financial positions of an organization’s financial statement.

MGMT325
Principles of Management
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Complete 200 level business courses
Co-requisites: ENGL102

Principles of Management is a survey course encompassing the functions of managers: planning, organizing, leading & controlling. Within this framework, we will study such topic such as the history of management, decision making, strategy, ethics, international management, entrepreneurship, human resources, group dynamics and communication.

MKTG311
Marketing Principles & Problems
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Complete 200 level business courses
Co-requisites: ENGL102

The course focuses on a thorough understanding of the modern marketing system as it operates in our contemporary society. Besides teaching of the basic vocabulary of the discipline, its major objective is to deal in a comprehensive way with marketing principles, theories, practices and strategies. Some of the main highlights of the course are: the design, distribution, pricing, and promotion of goods, services, people, places and causes, national and international markets, and legal and ethical constraints.
 
 
Computer Science
CSCI101
Introduction to Computers
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

The aim of this course is to provide students with no or minimal background in computers with basic knowledge and skills in the computing environment, and to provide a foundation from which to advance to higher level courses in computer-related fields. This course introduces students to the Internet, computer hardware and its peripherals, the operating system, software, communication and networks

CSCI102
Programming in C++
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ACCT201
Co-requisites: None

The purpose of this course is to teach students with no or minimal programming knowledge the basics of C++ programming language. This course discusses fundamental conceptual models for objectoriented programming and illustrates these through C++ programming language and application problems.

CSCI117
Computer Programming – JAVA
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CSCI102
Co-requisites: None

This course explains the concept of objectoriented programming and discusses concepts such as classes, inheritance, and methods using Java language. It also introduces available classes (Swing) to develop graphical user interfaces (GUIs), event-driven programming, and exception handling.

CSCI221
Object-Oriented Programming
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: CSCI102
Co-requisites: None

This course discusses fundamental conceptual models for object-oriented programming and illustrates these with C++ programming language and application problems. Topics include classes, operator overloading, inheritance, virtual functions, polymorphism, templates, exception handling, software reuse, and programming paradigms.

CSCI251
Programming for Engineers and Scientists
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGR196
Co-requisites: MATH172

This course introduces students to structured programming using the C language. C language features including data types, constants, operator statements, functions, arrays and pointers. Students will learn how to develop programs using pseudo code and flow charts, and write applications to solve problems in engineering and the sciences.
 
 
Engineering
ELEC201
Linear Circuit Theory I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ELEC207, MATH353, MATH271

Linear Circuit Theory covers volt-ampere characteristics for circuit elements, independent and dependent sources; Kirchhoff ’s laws, circuit equations; operational amplifier, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems; superposition; mesh and nodal analysis; transient response of RC, RL and RLC circuits; sinusoidal sources; phasors; and the use of Pspice.

ELEC202
Linear Circuit Theory II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ELEC201
Co-requisites: None

This course is a continuation of ELEC201, covering use of Laplace Transform techniques to analyze linear circuits with and without initial conditions, characterization of circuits based upon impedance, admittance, and transfer function parameters; determination of frequency response via analysis of poles and zeros in the complex plane; the relationship between the transfer function and the impulse response of a circuit; use of continuous time convolution to determine time domain responses; properties and practical uses of resonant circuits and transformers; input – output characterization of a circuit as a two-port; and low and high-pass filter design.

ELEC207
Electronic Measurement Technique Lab for ELEC201
Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ELEC201

This course which is to be taken with ELEC201. This course covers voltage, current, impedance, frequency and waveform measurements; frequency and transient response; use of operational amplifiers in instrumentation systems; and circuit problem solving using Pspice.

ENGR121
Engineering Graphics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course provides an introduction to Engineering Graphics, including fundamental concepts, practice, and application in the areas of freehand sketching and lettering. Also included are fundamentals of orthographic projection with applications; isometric and oblique views; sectional and auxiliary views; dimensioning and tolerancing screws; threads and fastener working drawings with AutoCAD.

ENGR196
Engineering Problem Solving
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course is an introduction to the field of engineering, engineering disciplines, SI and English units, conversion of units and equations. Also covered are the concept of datum, pressure, temperature and energy; introduction to computers, engineering design, communication and report writing; statistics, summary diagrams, normal distribution, engineering economy, and the use of MS Word, MS Excel, PowerPoint and MatLab for engineering problem solving

MECH200
Thermodynamics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: MATH172

This course introduces students to basic concepts of thermodynamics, such as properties evaluation of gases and incompressible substances; theory and applications of the First and Second Law of Thermodynamics; energy, entropy, gas power, vapor power and refrigeration cycles.

MECH270
Basic Mechanics I – Statics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH172
Co-requisites: None

This course introduces students to mechanics, concurrent forces, equilibrium of particles, equilibrium of rigid bodies, concentrated and distributed force systems; centroids, center of gravity, equilibrium of trusses, frames, and machines; analysis of internal forces in beams and cables; moments of inertia and frictional forces.

MECH274
Basic Mechanics II – Dynamics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MECH270, PHYS211
Co-requisites: MATH271

This course covers three modules: Module one covers kinematics and kinetics of particles; energy and momentum methods; and system of particles are discussed. The second module treats the equations of motion and energy; and momentum principles for rigid bodies in planar motion. The third module covers the kinematics; equations of motion; and energy and momentum methods for rigid bodies in three-dimensional motion.
 
 
Mathematics
MATH110
College Algebra
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

The course emphasizes the connections among graphical, numerical and algebraic concepts and between algebra and other branches of mathematics. Topics include equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, matrices and system of linear equations, sequences, series and probability.

MATH150
Pre-Calculus
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course is designed to prepare students for learning calculus. Students will develop skills and stamina necessary to solve lengthy, multi-step problems, involving a variety of pre-calculus mathematical concepts. Students will also develop independence of thought and algebraic sophistication necessary to be successful in their study of calculus.

MATH161
Calculus For Business I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Credit in Modern Mathematics (SPM or O Level)
Co-requisites: None

This course introduces students to calculus with applications to business, algebra review, functions, graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives, logarithmic and exponential functions.

MATH162
Calculus For Business II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH161
Co-requisites: None

This course is a continuation of MATH161. It continues with the derivatives of logarithmic and exponential functions, and introduces students to integration with applications to business.

MATH171
Calculus I
Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Credit in Additional Mathematics (SPM or O Level)
Co-requisites: None

This course concentrates on analytical geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions, applications of derivatives, and integration.

MATH172
Calculus II
Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: MATH171
Co-requisites: None

This course covers applications of integration, further techniques of integration, infinite series, conic sections, parameter-ized curves and polar coordinates.

MATH208
Discrete Mathematics
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH172
Co-requisites: None

This course is an introduction to discrete mathematical structures and their applications to computer science. Topics include prepositional logic, predicate logic, set theory, functions, algorithms and their complexity, applications of number theory, mathematical induction, recursive definitions and algorithms, counting, permutations, combinations, probability, recurrence relations, inclusion-exclusion, relations, graphs and trees, and Boolean algebra.

MATH271
Calculus III
Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: MATH172
Co-requisites: None

This course covers vectors and analytical geometry in space, differential calculus of functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector calculus.

MATH319
Linear Algebra
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: MATH271

This course is an introduction to basic concepts and applications of linear algebra. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors spaces, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and linear transformations.

MATH353
Differential Equation
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: MATH271

This course introduces students to the theory, applications, techniques, and numerical methods of differential equations, to solve problems in engineering and science. Materials that will be covered are first and second order linear differential equations and their applications, Laplace transform, and special functions and series solution of differential equations.

STAT230
Statistics I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH161 or MATH110
Co-requisites: None

This course focuses on the quantitative and qualitative analysis of statistical data, descriptive statistics, probability concepts and distribution, statistical sampling and distribution, statistical estimation, linear regression and correlation, and residual analysis and applications of statistics in business and economics.

STAT261
Statistics For Engineering and Sciences
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MATH171
Co-requisites: None

The course focuses on basic probability and statistics with applications in engineering and sciences. Materials that will be covered are quantitative and qualitative analysis of statistical data, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, random variables and their distributions, random processes, statistical inferences, curve fitting and prediction, correlation and application to quality assurance and reliability

STAT330
Statistics II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: STAT230, Complete 200 level business courses
Co-requisites: None

This course focuses on the application of the principles learned in the earlier statistics classes. In addition, students will be exposed to new concepts such the analysis of variance (ANOVA), multiple regressions, model building, time series analysis and forecasting, non-parametric statistics, statistical process control (SPC), decision theory and analysis, and index numbers. Business, economic and production / manufacturing applications will be emphasized.
 
 
Applied Sciences
BIOL160
Biological Science (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: CHEM101
Co-requisites: None

This course covers basic concepts of the organization of life at the molecular and cellular level, flow of energy through living systems, transmission of genetic information and mechanisms of evolution. Also included are transmission of hereditary information, DNA as the carrier of genetic material and as a code for protein synthesis in the cell, energy flow at the cellular level with focus on ATP as the main usable energy source, ATP’s production and usage, and transfer of energy through the various trophic levels in the ecosystem. Survival of the fittest by natural selection is linked to the adaptation of a population to changes in allelic frequency in the cell.

CHEM101
Fundamentals of Chemistry (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This is an introductory course to fundamentals of chemistry. Students will be taught the basic concepts and principles of chemistry, such as stoichiometry, nomenclature, chemical bonding and chemical reaction. Students will also learn laboratory techniques related to the theoretical concepts, such as the use of chemical balance, take measurements, separation and purification of mixtures, preparation of salts, stoichiometry, and titration.

CHEM105
General Chemistry I (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: MATH171

This is an introductory course to basic chemical phenomenal laws and their application, study of atomic structure and chemical bonding, stoichiometry and thermochemistry.

CHEM106
General Chemistry II (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: CHEM105
Co-requisites: None

This course involves the study of phenomenological laws as well as atomic theories of chemistry in chemical equilibrium, directed valence, inorganic, organic, polymer and radio chemistry.

CHEM221
Organic Chemistry I (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course gives an introduction to organic chemistry and builds upon the concepts of organic reactions and synthesis of compounds and exploration of various chemical reactions in building higher organic compounds. It builds upon the concepts students learned in CHEM106.

NUTR201
Fundamentals of Human Nutrition
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This is a beginner’s level nutritional science course that integrates basic concepts of science with the study of food and nutrition. It is designed for those who wants an introduction to food and nutrition and who may later choose a major in it. The course will also provide elementary aspects of the several biological sciences.

NUTR202
Nutrition for Health and Disease
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This course reviews nutritional applications in physical performance and disease prevention. Students will learn the basic information about nutrition-related concerns during the various human life cycles, the benefits of a physically active lifestyle, the supporting food safety measures and technologies in reducing the risk of food-borne illnesses, and the health consequences of malnutrition and over-nutrition.

PHYS211
Physics for Science and Engineering I (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: MATH172
Co-requisites: None

This course is the first of a two- semester sequence in introductory physics with laboratory for science and engineering students. This course covers calculus-based studies including Newtonian mechanics, oscillation and waves, fluids, heat, and thermodynamics.

PHYS212
Physics for Science and Engineering Il (With Lab)
Credit Hours: 4
Prerequisites: PHYS211
Co-requisites: None

This course is the continuation of a two-semester sequence in introductory physics with laboratory for science and engineering students. This course covers calculus-based studies including electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
 
 
English
ENGL090
Reading and Writing Foundations
Credit Hours: 5
Prerequisites: Based on EPT results
Co-requisites: None

ENGL090 is a first level basic writing course which introduces students to academic writing. Students will be taken step by step through the writing process, from formulating ideas through the revision stage. Students will be required to write effective paragraphs on contemporary subjects from the health, cultures, social sciences, sciences and humanities that are relevant to their current or future academic coursework. Reading skills such as skimming, scanning, making inferences etc. would be emphasized. Much focus will also be devoted to the development of fluency and accuracy in applying grammatical structures. Students will be exposed to a range of themes throughout the course.

ENGL093
Basic Writing II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Based on EPT results
Co-requisites: None

ENGL093 is an English preparatory course which focuses on the development of both academic writing and reading skills, as they are essential to succeed in any undergraduate setting. Grammar is incorporated and will be taught in context. To practice these skills, authentic course materials will be used as much as possible and a wide range of themes will be explored. Students will be exposed to a variety of academic texts throughout the course.

ENGL101
English Composition I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Based on EPT or completion of ENGL093
Co-requisites: None

English Composition I is a writing workshop. Students can expect to do a lot of writing and revising. The course is designed to prepare students to write short essays. The course introduces concepts like Thesis Statements and focuses on discursive and argumentative pieces.

ENGL102
English Composition II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This course develops skills in critical reading and writing, and research strategies. It will further refine the student’s abilities to synthesize material from independent reading, to develop sophisticated, situation-sensitive reading and writing strategies. The course emphasizes the importance of all stages of students’ writing processes, including invention, drafting, revising, editing and proofreading. The course involves also the effective communication of student’s ideas through writing and discussion.

ENGL200
Introduction to American Literature
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This is an introductory course for which no previous literary training is assumed. Focus is on the different genres – the short story, novel, poetry and drama. Students will learn how to interpret and appreciate selected works from American Literature.

ENGL210
Introduction to Creative Writing
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This is an introduction to the art and craft of Creative Writing with a specific focus on poetry and prose/short fiction. This is a writing-intensive course, which will be conducted as a workshop or studio, where students will be expected to write and read out their own work on a weekly basis. This course will look at a range of classical and contemporary work in poets, prose/short fiction to help students create their own distinct voices and way of writing. Students will be expected to engage in critical discourse, and develop a way of using writing as a way of looking at the world, a way of seeing and expressing the human condition through words. Students will complete a Writing Portfolio by the end of the semester.
 
 
Liberal Arts
FILM 101
Introduction to Film Studies
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This course will acquaint students with an understanding of the basics of film history, genre, and technique. It will examine the elements of the construction of narrative and documentary film, and the elements of production including cinematography, editing, and performance. It will address the role of the director and the definition of film genre and style. These topics will be covered in a roughly historical framework with particular emphasis in the beginning given to the silent film.The thematic focus of the course will be the relationship between film and modernism.

HIST101
World Civilizations I (to 1500)
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is an introductory survey of the salient features in the development of world civilizations from prehistoric times until 1500s. Emphasis is laid on the basic formative factors of historical development of societies and massive civilizations in the world to 1500s – economic, social, ideological, cultural, religious as well as political. The course covers the rise and decline of early civilizations and their interactions with the surrounding societies and environments. The course concludes with the coming of European overseas voyages and imperial expansions.

HIST102
World Civilizations II (from 1500)
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is an introductory survey of the salient features in the development of world civilizations from 1500s to the present. Emphasis is laid on the basic formative factors of historical development in the world since 1600s – economic, social, ideological, cultural, religious as well as political. The course covers European overseas voyages, imperial expansion, revolutions against excessive government power and authority, and the development of new science and technologies. The course concludes with the formation of new international, national, religious and gender identities in the last few decades.

HIST105
U.S. History to 1877
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is a survey of the historical events, personalities and factors, which had contributed to the development of the United States of America from pre-Colonial era to the Reconstruction in 1865. The survey includes pre-Columbian times, the arrival of the Europeans, the American Revolution and independence from the British, the birth of a new nation and constitution, Western expansion, the attempt to break up the nation, Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIST106
U.S. History since 1877
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is a survey of the American history from the Reconstruction to the present. The class will examine the historical events, personalities, and factors that contributed to the development of the United States of America in the 19th and 20th centuries. The survey includes US territorial and economic expansion, industrialization, and urbanization, Manifest Destiny, reforms in the Progressive and New Deal eras, World Wars, world power status and post-war transformations.

MUSC103
Introduction to Music
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This introductory course explores music of different historical periods and cultures including contemporary and popular examples. The course aims to enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of music.

PHIL101
Introduction to Philosophy
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This course is designed to be a historically oriented introduction to philosophy, in which the development of philosophical thought is traced through the various periods: from the Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, to more contemporary times. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with the history of western philosophy, teach students the basic vocabulary of philosophical discourse, introduce students to the major disputes and theories of philosophy, hone the students’ analytical skills and help the students develop their own views about the various philosophical issues

POLS101
American Government
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is an introductory survey of the United States national government. Topics covered include the American Federal system, national and state governments, the US constitutional principles, political participation, electoral process, and functions of political institutions. This will include the theory and practice of politics, the organization and use of power at various levels, individual interest groups, organizations, the state and international relations. Emphasis will also be on the role of political parties, political ideologies, the relationship between the three main branches of government and the impact on public policy.

POLS207
Introduction to International Relations
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course surveys the theoretical and the practical dimensions of IR. It examines the evolution of the international system and explores the current relationship between the states and international organizations. Topics will also include diplomacy, foreign policy, causes of war and peace, international political economy and foreign financial assistance.

PSYC201
General Psychology
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is designed to introduce psychology as a scientific researchbased approach to understanding the fundamentals of mental and behavioral processes. It includes everything, from the activity of single cells to the interactions of groups and introduces the numerous but integrated subfields of psychology.

PSYC226
Social Psychology
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC201
Co-requisites: None

This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of social psychology. It will cover key theories and theoretical developments in the field, research methodologies and some application to current social issues. The material covers phenomena related to social behavior and social influences on behavior. Topics include self-concept, social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, attraction, helping, aggression, interpersonal influence and group processes. Social psychology defers from sociology in that the latter studies social behavior at the macro level whereas the former deals with the more interpersonal level.

SOCS101
Sociology I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course introduces students to sociological processes with emphasis on sociological theory and methodology, relationship between individuals, culture and society, characteristics of class structure and social institutions.

SOCS102
Sociology II
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

An extension of Sociology I, this course continues to deal with issues pertaining to social inequality, social institutions and social change. Also covered are focus on the areas of gerontology as well as sex and gender, social institutions including religion, economy, politics, health and medicine.

THTR101
Foundations of Acting I
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None

This is a practical course to introduce students to the basic skills of acting. To this end they will be given voice training, relaxation and movement exercises. They will also be given an opportunity to use language effectively by writing scripts based on improvised scenes developed in class. In addition students will explore themes from well-known pieces ranging from the Greek to modern theater.

WREL105
World Religion
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course exposes students to studies of Eastern and Western religions beginning with prehistoric and primal religious sources and including the origins, teachings, practices and primary characteristics of contemporary world religions.
 
 
Mass Communication
ADVS210
Advertising
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This is an introductory course to advertising that focuses on the foundation and basic principles of advertising, and emphasizes on theories, concepts and practice of this dynamic discipline. The course will also include advertising campaign and integrated marketing communication concepts to further reinforce the principles and theories of the subject.

COMM101
Introduction to Mass Communication
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course considers how the modern mass media developed and what they are developing into. Students will examine how and why traditional mass mediums are converging with the new or digital media and the social, political and personal impacts of these changes. Students will also be studying in depth the traditional mass media that use print, broadcast, sound and filmic ways of producing and conveying messages to audiences, and the evolution of these mediums in conjunction with broader historical and cultural changes.

COMM105
Interpersonal Communication
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course exposes students to the concepts and principles of interpersonal communication, both practical and theoretical. Students will be exposed to the role of language and its influence on interpersonal communication. The role of non-verbal communication in interpersonal communication will also be analyzed. Students will be exposed to specific situations in which various interpersonal communication principles can be observed and analyzed and will also be provided the opportunity to analyze their own interpersonal communication styles.

COMM215
Cross Cultural Communication
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This introductory course is to equip students with knowledge of concepts, principles, and skills necessary to understand and communicate with people from cultures other than their own. Students’ cultural self-awareness will be the starting point. The course then focuses on one’s attitudes and feelings toward people from different cultures and their impact on personal behavior.

GBUS271
Business Communication
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This course explores the basic foundation and principles of effective communication in businesses and professions. It also deals with the fundamentals of business communication needed to achieve individual and organization success.

PREL201
Public Relations
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL101
Co-requisites: None

This is an introductory course to the field of public relations, from its historical context and contemporary implications, to its strategies and tactics. Students will come to understand the basic concepts of effective public relations and its practice in today’s fast changing world. Students will also look at some of the issues facing public relations practitioners in today’s increasingly technological, multicultural and global environment.

SPCH105
Effective Public Communication
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: ENGL101

This course is designed to provide students with the basic skills of public speaking and to familiarize them with the principles of speech communication. The main thrust of the course is to provide them with the theory of public speaking and practical experience in preparing and delivering a speech whether impromptu, informative or persuasive. Students will learn the ability to adapt material to particular audiences, reason from evidence to conclusions, and organize ideas according to the demands of informative and persuasive public speaking situations. By the end of the course, students should be able to deliver ideas in public settings using an extemporaneous method of presentation with effective channeling of speech anxiety and will have developed critical listening skills and the ability to assess and evaluate messages.